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Advancing knowledge about spatial modeling, infectious diseases, environmen...

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The Fields Institute

222 College St

Toronto, ON M5S 3E6

Canada

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Description:

Identifying disease clusters and spatial patterns of disease (from a human/animal/plant) are important to inform policymakers, programs and interventions at both local and global scales. For instance, Canadian health authorities depend on alerts provided by front-line employees or by members of the public when there is an increase in disease or illness (disease cluster). Health authorities need to respond to cluster inquiries to inform the public that: a) no clustering exists, or b) to warn the public and investigate the cause of the cluster. The recent emergence of the Zika virus as a global pandemic is one example of a critical public health threat that challenged management systems. The rapid spread of Zika across much of the Americas is not well understood. Space-time patterns of spread span multiple scales due to complex disease ecological processes and biases from surveillance data generated from multi-jurisdictions with varying sampling protocols are real challenges. These issues, which are also common to high priority diseases in Canada (e.g., Lyme disease), can be difficult to accommodate in quantitative frameworks, and hamper the ability to use data and modeling products to accurately monitor disease and identify vulnerable populations either spatially or over space-time. We will spearhead innovation in disease modeling by addressing several practical problems related to infectious diseases in environment and health by advancing statistical and mathematical modeling techniques.

Scientific background:

Internationally, the United Nations has called for a more rigorous approach, including the application of spatial-temporal modeling, for surveillance and disease reporting, particularly for groups societally marginalized. To address this gap, we will invite world-renowned researchers with expertise in mathematical and statistical modeling of spatial and temporal data. In this workshop, our goal is to better integrate population and environmental data for infectious diseases using spatial modeling techniques. As objectives of this workshop: our invited speakers will talk about recent developments in spatial and temporal modeling techniques; we will also highlight recent advances in spatial individual-level statistical models (ILMs) and area-level statistical model (ALM) which are related to infectious disease outcomes. Expected impact: Complexities of (infectious) disease ecology and quality of data used to characterize disease processes pose important challenges to authorities who need to monitor and respond to emerging and existing diseases in humans, animals, and plants. Statistical and mathematical models can have crucial roles in investigating disease-host systems and informing appropriate population management strategies. By addressing the objectives of this workshop, we will provide new mathematical and statistical techniques that solve prevalent problems stated above in the analysis of (infectious) disease data. An immediate outcome of this workshop is helping our organizations across Canada (we will also invite health researchers from Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada) to implement novel modeling products that will improve current technologies that are used to inform population health. Our proposed models will better reflect the true infectious disease dynamics and account for data imperfections, and therefore, researchers, end- users at various agencies, and decision-makers will have better tools for drawing the appropriate conclusions of disease ecology and devising effective disease management strategies to ultimately improve the health of Canadians and globe.

Organizing Committee:

Charmaine Dean – University of Waterloo

Rob Deardon – University of Calgary

Cindy Feng – University of Saskatchewan

Rhonda Rosychuk – University of Alberta

Mahmoud Torabi – University of Manitoba


Funding application:

If you need funding support to participate in this program, you may apply here:

https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5394316/20-06-Jun-8-Jun-12-2020-Workshop-on-Spatial-Modeling-of-Infectious-Diseases-Environment-and-Health-Funding-Application

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Date and Time

Location

The Fields Institute

222 College St

Toronto, ON M5S 3E6

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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