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An Evening with Author and Educator Cecil Foster

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A talk by author and educator Cecil Foster

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Mr. Foster will speak about his most recent book, “They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters and the Birth of Modern Canada”.

Cecil Foster is a Canadian novelist, essayist, journalist, Public intellectual and scholar. He is currently Chairman of the Department of Transnational Studies at the University of Buffalo. Mr. Foster is well known for exploring race through immigration, and empowers this culture and beliefs through "Blacks in Action".

They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters and the Birth of Modern Canada Synopsis:

Smartly dressed and smiling, Canada’s Black train porters were a familiar sight to the average passenger—yet their minority status rendered them politically invisible, second-class in the social imagination that determined who was and who was not considered Canadian. Subjected to grueling shifts and unreasonable standards—a passenger missing his stop was a dismissible offense—the so-called Pullmen of the country’s rail lines were denied secure positions and prohibited from bringing their families to Canada, and it was their struggle against the racist Dominion that laid the groundwork for the multicultural nation we know today. Drawing on the experiences of these influential black Canadians, Cecil Foster’s They Call Me George demonstrates the power of individuals and minority groups in the fight for social justice and shows how a country can change for the better.

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Organizer Guelph Black Heritage Society

Organizer of An Evening with Author and Educator Cecil Foster

Established in 2011, the mission of the Guelph Black Heritage Society is to restore and maintain Heritage Hall, originally known as the British Methodist Episcopal (BME) Church, built in 1880 by former fugitive slaves who arrived in the area via the Underground Railroad. The building is a cultural, historical and social community centre serving to promote Guelph and Wellington County's distinctive place in Southwestern Ontario's rich Black heritage.

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