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Are we managing BC forests in ecologically and socially responsible ways?

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Harbour Centre

515 West Hastings Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

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Invitation:

The Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University is pleased to invite you to a talk and discussion about the sustainability of forests in BC presented by Herb Hammond, a forest ecologist and forester with Silva Ecosystem Consultants.

Ken Lertzman and Evelyn Pinkerton, professors in SFU’s School of Resource and Environmental Management (REM), will respond to the presentation before moderator Sean Markey, REM professor, opens the conversation to the audience.

If you aren't able to join us in person but would like to hear the talk, it will be livestreamed on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SFUENV/ and posted to our YouTube Channel on Feb 26th.

Abstract:

BC forests provide essential ecological values such as carbon sequestration and storage, biodiversity, and water. Forests also provide a diversity of social values, from healthy environments to recreation; and economic values from timber and wood products to tourism and mitigation of climate change. Indigenous people embrace long-held cultural and spiritual values of forests—values which non-indigenous people increasingly share.

Public policies that guide forest conservation and use, and the practice of forestry are putting this diverse ecosystem that sustains us in many ways at risk. Coupled with climate change, our decisions about forest management are contributing to the frequency and size of wildfires, more rapid water runoff and flooding, water shortages and stress on the biological diversity that sustains human society.

How do we improve protection of forests for the well-being of today’s and future generations? What changes in government jurisdiction, planning, and management are needed? What is the appropriate role for private industry in forest management? How do timber and non-timber economic activities coexist in ways fair to all participants? Perhaps the overriding question is, how do we relate to and interact with forests in the face of climate change?

This talk will highlight the importance of forests to our survival, examine the ecological, social, and economic effectiveness of current government policies and industry practices, and explore solutions on how we can manage forests in ecologically and socially responsible ways that will mitigate the effects of climate change, and assist species and ecosystems to adapt to different climates.

Biographies:

Herb Hammond (Guest Speaker) is a forest ecologist and forester with Silva Ecosystem Consultants Ltd. in Slocan Park, BC. He is a registered professional forester and forest ecologist with over 40 years of experience in research, industry, teaching and consulting. Together with his wife Susan, he founded the Silva Forest Foundation, a charitable society dedicated to research and education in ecosystem-based conservation planning. Herb has worked cooperatively with aboriginal nations and rural communities to develop more than 20 ecosystem-based plans across Canada, Russia, the United States and Indonesia. Herb received the Gold Award for Sustainable Living at the Canadian Environmental Awards. His award-winning books, Maintaining Whole Systems on Earth’s Crown: Ecosystem-based Conservation Planning for the Boreal Forest and Seeing the Forest Among the Trees: The Case for Wholistic Forest Use continue to be used by a wide audience in planning forest protection and use. He has a B.S. in Forest Management from Oregon State University and a Masters of Forestry from the University of Washington.

Ken Lertzman (Respondent) is a professor in the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. Ken is a forest ecologist with broad interests in ecosystem dynamics, conservation, and management. His research focuses on how natural disturbance regimes and management interact to produce pattern and dynamics in forest stands and landscapes. Ken has an ongoing interest in how changing climate drives ecosystems and the landscapes and resources available to people who live in them. He works closely with researchers from other disciplines, as well as representatives of government agencies, First Nations, industries, and other non-governmental groups in applying research to problems in ecosystem conservation, restoration, and management. He has a special interest in ideas and practices related to ecosystem-based management. Ken is a Certified Senior Ecologist with the Ecological Society of America and is an Honorary Member of the Association of BC Forest Professionals.

Evelyn Pinkerton (Respondent) is a maritime anthropologist who has integrated common property theory and cultural/political ecology in considering the role communities play in the management of adjacent renewable natural resources. She has played a key role in developing the theory and practice of power-sharing and stewardship through co-management agreements. Beginning with the introduction to her 1989 edited volume Cooperative Management of Local Fisheries (UBC Press), she has been generating middle-range theoretical propositions about the conditions under which co-management is likely to arise and to endure. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles on fisheries and forestry co-management arrangements, and in Fisheries that Work (1995, co-authored with Martin Weinstein), began to develop a more comprehensive framework for analyzing and comparing co-management arrangements. This work has since evolved into analysis of the developmental sequence of types of co-management rights and activities.

Sean Markey (Moderator) is a Professor with the School of Resource and Environmental Management. His research concerns issues of local and regional economic development, rural and small-town development, community sustainability, and natural infrastructure. Sean continues to work with municipalities, non-profit organizations, Aboriginal communities and the business community to promote and develop sustainable forms of community and regional development. He serves on the Board of Directors with the Vancity Community Foundation. Sean is also an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Geography at the University of Northern British Columbia.

Hosted by:

The Faculty of Environment, Simon Fraser University, and Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

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Harbour Centre

515 West Hastings Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

Canada

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