CyGS Student Award Winner - Dr. C.K.Wong

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2500 University Dr NW

2500 University Drive Northwest

Calgary, AB T2N 1N4

Canada

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Event description
Join us for a lecture by Dr. C.K.Wong on Physical Soil-Pipe Interaction Model Tests and their practical implications.

About this Event

DATE: Thursday October 17, 2019

PLACE:

University of Calgary

2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary AB

Room: Science Theatre 128

TIME:

5:30 – 6:00 pm: Cash bar and light snack

6:00 – 7:00 pm: Presentation

COST: $20 for Regular Members, Free for Student Members. Please RSVP for Regular and Student Members to assist with ordering refreshments.

Speaker:

Dr. Chee K. Wong is a Post-Doctorate Scholar at the University of Calgary currently working on high temperature and high pressure strength testing of shales and mine tailings. He completed his PhD at the U of C in 2018 and has published articles in journals and conferences on topics including the hybrid failure mode in compacted clay, physical modelling of buried pipeline response in elasto-viscoplastic soils and crack initiation in brittle rock under pore pressure elevation. Dr. Wong was the winner of the EIT/Student Award for his paper on __________ and will be presenting his findings in this paper at the CGS conference in St. John's NFL.

Abstract

Pipelines have been designed and constructed to transport essential natural resources such as water, oil, and natural gas. They are constructed at shallow depths through different geologic terrains. Permanent ground deformations can occur in actively moving slopes, landslides, surface faulting and ground subsidence. These ground movements impose external load on buried pipes. Large strain may be accumulated in the buried pipes over time, and it may affect the performance of the pipes. The external load exerted on the pipe by the ground movement is dependent on the soil resistance mobilized in soil-pipe interaction. Recent available pipeline design guidelines (e.g., American Lifelines Alliance (ALA) and Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI))provide recommendations on soil ultimate resistances for different soil types in drained and undrained loading conditions. However, these guidelines do not consider the effect of soil displacement rate on the soil ultimate resistance in soil-pipe interaction. This paper proposes to use the concept of “isotache” behavior to quantify the relationship between the soil-pipe relative displacement rate and the soil ultimate resistance on the pipe in soil-pipe interaction in compacted clays. The relationship is developed based on results measured in physical soil-pipe interaction models. Practical examples are presented to illustrate the use of this relationship to evaluate the performance of buried pipelines subjected to short-and long-term ground movements.

Abstract

Unconfined compression strength(UCS)or response is used as a consistency index for classification of natural clay. This strength is determined from an unconfined compression test, a special type of unconsolidated-undrained test in which no confining pressure is applied to the test specimen and the specimen is sheared in an undrained condition. For saturated clay, the UCS or undrained shear strength is independent of the confining pressure, and is an indicator of consistency in stiffness. However, the structure of compacted clay is more heterogeneous than that of natural clay because of variation in compaction effort and water content in compacted clay. This study investigates if UCS can be used as a consistency index for compacted clay. Two different types of clay, Calgary till and Regina clay were used. The clay contents of Calgary till and Regina clay are about 15 and 45%, respectively. Compacted clay specimens were prepared at varying water contents using standard Proctor method. Computer X-ray scanning technique and filter paper method were conducted to quantify the variation of bulk density and matric suction along the specimen height for compacted specimens, respectively. Then, unconfined compression tests were conducted on the compacted clay specimens to determine the UCS. Empirical correlations among bulk density, matric suction and UCS were developed. In addition, these data were analyzed using a statistical approach. The results provide confidence levels for the use of UCS as a consistency index for compacted clay used in construction

Date and Time

Location

2500 University Dr NW

2500 University Drive Northwest

Calgary, AB T2N 1N4

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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