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Don Valley 2021Threats and Opportunities

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St. Matthew's Clubhouse

450 Broadview Avenue

Toronto, ON M4K 2N1

Canada

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Event description
Lost Rivers outdoor walks resume with a historical perspective on the past, present and future of Toronto's Don Valley

About this event

Sunday Aug 1, 2021 at 10:00

Toronto's Don River is Canada's most urbanized river. Stretching south from its headwaters in the Oak Ridges Moraine and running 36km before emptying into Lake Ontario, the Don has been profoundly changed by overuse, pollution, industry, road and railways and urbanization since the beginning of Toronto as a colonial city.

The river was renamed by the first colonial Governor - Lieutenant Governor Simcoe. This was just one of many re-namings that obscured over 15,000 years of Indigenous history with an overlay of colonial “reality”. We will talk on the walk about versions of the original name, Wonscotanach, and possible English translations. The walk will discuss lessons learned, lessons forgotten and lessons that remained to be addressed along this unique urban watershed.

Walk leaders: Floyd Ruskin and friends

Start at St Matthews Clubhouse, 450 Broadview Ave at Langley. Easily accessible by transit.

A mostly flat walk of 2.5km, concluding at Todmorden Mills at Pottery Road, there is one set of stairs to navigate with public washrooms at the start of the walk

About 1.5 to 2 hours.


		Don Valley 2021Threats and Opportunities image

		Don Valley 2021Threats and Opportunities image
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Date and time

Location

St. Matthew's Clubhouse

450 Broadview Avenue

Toronto, ON M4K 2N1

Canada

View Map

Organizer Lost Rivers

Organizer of Don Valley 2021Threats and Opportunities

The objective of Lost River Walks is to encourage understanding of the city as a part of nature rather than apart from it, and to appreciate and cherish our  heritage. Lost River Walks aims to create an appreciation of the city’s  intimate connection to its water systems by tracing the courses of forgotten  streams, by learning about our natural and built heritage and by sharing this  information with others.

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