$0 – $45

Edible Wild Berries: Iconic Canadian Food

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Toronto Botanical Garden

777 Lawrence Avenue East

Toronto, ON M3C 1P2

Canada

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The fragrance of woodland strawberries, the tangy taste of chokecherry jelly, and the deep rich colour of blueberry pie – for many Canadians, picking and eating wild berries is a cherished memory and much-anticipated activity. For thousands of years, these fruits have also been a key component of Indigenous peoples’ food systems, providing important nutrients and flavours, and contributing to local economies and culture.

Nancy will present some of the most interesting wild berry species, describing their cultural significance, traditional harvesting and processing techniques, and population threats. She will also demonstrate how many wild berry species are easily propagated, and grow particularly well in garden settings where they provide beauty, interest and food.

Pre-lecture light dinner available from 5:30 p.m. Floral Hall doors open at 6:30 p.m.

This lecture is cohosted by the North American Native Plant Society.


About Nancy Turner

Nancy Turner is an ethnobotanist and ethnoecologist whose research focuses on traditional knowledge systems and traditional land and resource management systems of Indigenous Peoples of western Canada. She is Professor Emeritus and 2015 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Fellow in the School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, BC.

Nancy has worked with First Nations elders and cultural specialists in northwestern North America for over 45 years, helping to document, retain and promote their traditional knowledge of plants and environments, including Indigenous foods, materials and medicines. Her two-volume book, Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America, represents an integration of her long term research.

She has authored or co-authored/co-edited over 20 other books, including: Plants of Haida Gwaii; The Earth’s Blanket; Keeping it Living: Traditions of Plant Use and Cultivation on the Northwest Coast of North America (with Doug Deur); Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSÁNEC’ People (with Richard Hebda); and Secwepemc People and Plants: Research Papers in Shuswap Ethnobotany (with Marianne Ignace and Sandra Peacock) as well as many book chapters and peer-reviewed papers.

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Location

Toronto Botanical Garden

777 Lawrence Avenue East

Toronto, ON M3C 1P2

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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