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From Nuclear Weapons to Killer Robots

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Great Hall, Hart House

7 Hart House Circle

Toronto, ON M5S 3H3

Canada

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From Nuclear Weapons to Killer Robots: A Conversation on Science and Responsibility

About this Event

This final event in our Centennial Dialogue series is inspired by a 1987 Hart House debate featuring Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Dr. John Polanyi exploring the responsibility of the scientist.

John Polanyi returns for a reprise of this critical conversation joined by Jason Millar and Isabelle Jones.

With the fast pace of scientific developments - developments like AI and autonomous technology that present the potential for transformation but also great harm - how do we approach discovery and development within a lens of commitment to peace, human rights, transparency and democracy? What are the responsible approaches to managing and understanding risk? How do communities engage meaningfully in these vital discussions? Join us for an important conversation about an issue that impacts us all.

Speakers:

Dr. John Polanyi, 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, University Professor, University of Toronto

John Polanyi, educated at Manchester University, England, was a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University and the National Research Council, Canada. He is presently a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Toronto. His research is on the molecular motions in chemical reactions in gases and at surfaces. He is a Fellow of the Royal Societies of Canada (FRSC), of London (FRS), and of Edinburgh (FRSE), also of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the Pontifical Academy of Rome and the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada (PC), and a Companion of the Order of Canada (CC). His awards include the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the Royal Medal of the Royal Society of London, and over thirty honorary degrees from six countries. He has served on the Prime Minister of Canada’s Advisory Board on Science and Technology, the Premier’s Council of Ontario, as Foreign Honorary Advisor to the Institute for Molecular Sciences, Japan, and as Honorary Advisor to the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, Germany.

Dr. Jason Millar, Canada Research Chair in Ethical Engineering of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, University of Ottawa

Jason Millar is an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Ottawa, with a cross-appointment in the Department of Philosophy. He holds the Canada Research Chair in the Ethical Engineering of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence (AI). Jason is also a Faculty Member at the Centre for Law, Technology and Society (uOttawa), leads the AI and Robotics Research and Engagement Cluster at uOttawa's Institute for Science, Society and Policy (ISSP), and is a member of the Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics. He researches the ethical engineering of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI), with a focus on empowering engineers to integrate ethical thinking into their daily engineering workflow. Jason’s work focuses primarily on the ethics, policy and engineering of automated vehicles, artificial intelligence, healthcare robotics, social and military robotics. Jason has a degree in engineering physics and worked for several years as an engineer before turning his full-time attention to issues in philosophy and applied ethics. He has authored book chapters, policy reports, and articles on the ethics and governance of robotics and AI. Jason has provided expert testimony at the United Nations CCW, and the Senate of Canada, on the ethics of highly automated military robots. He consults internationally on policy, and ethical engineering issues in emerging autonomous vehicle technology. His work is regularly featured in the media, including articles in publications such as WIRED and The Guardian, and interviews with the BBC, CBC and NPR. He recently authored a chapter titled "Social Failure Modes in Technology and the Ethics of AI: An Engineering Perspective" in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Ethics of AI.

Isabelle Jones, Campaign Outreach Manager, International Campaign to Stop Killer Robots

Isabelle Jones, is the Campaign Outreach Manager for the International Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. The campaign is an international coalition of 140 NGO’s in 61 countries working to ban fully autonomous weapons.

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Date and Time

Location

Great Hall, Hart House

7 Hart House Circle

Toronto, ON M5S 3H3

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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