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Seminars feature 45 minutes talks about women's health from multidisciplinary perspectives followed by an interactive Q&A period.

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Seminar Title: Hormones, Brain and Social Cognition

This event is part of the Women’s Health Seminar Series, which showcases multidisciplinary research on women’s health. The goal of the series is to provide multidisciplinary training and mentorship for trainees, across a broad range of women’s health research topics. Speakers will present their research regarding the biological, psychological, behavioural, economic and social impacts on women’s health outcomes. Each seminar will feature 45 minutes talks followed by an interactive question and answer period.

The series is open to anyone interested in attending!

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Presenter: Dr. Elena Choleris, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, University of Guelph

Dr. Choleris is particularly interested in various regulatory and modulatory aspects of social behavior. Among many, her team is investigating the neurobiological bases of (1) social learning whereby an individual acquires information from another individual, (2) social recognition, individual identification and memory (3) sociability, an individual's tendency to prefer to spend time with social vs non social stimuli, and (3) agonistic interactions in males and females. Their research involves small rodents, mainly mice and it involves an integration of various aspects of neuroscience from Ethological to Pharmacological, Molecular and Genetic. Naturalistic behavioral models as well as an evolutionary interpretation of results are pivotal factors in our research. The involvement of the cholinergic, dopaminergic, oxytocinnergic, and estrogenic systems in the social transmission of food preferences and social recognition are, at present, the main focus of their research.

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