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Galerie d'art d'Ottawa, Hall Alma Duncan | Ottawa Art Gallery, Alma Duncan Salon

50 Mackenzie King Bridge

Ottawa, ON K1N 0C5

Canada

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Event description
Projection of the indigenous movie Indian Horse, adapted from the novel written by Ojibway writer Richard Wagamese, followed by a discussion

About this Event

This Fall, the Ottawa Public Library is proud to present an indigenous Film series in partnership with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the Ottawa Art gallery. The three events start at 7 pm at the Alma Duncan Salon of the Ottawa Art Gallery and will all be followed by a discussion led by members of the Indigenous community.

About the movie

The story of the movie feature Saul Indian Horse , an Ojibway boy who is taken fromn his family and forced to attend a Catholic Residential School. He will discover there his abilities and love for the sport of hockey that will lead him to a professional career. Unfortunately, his childhood experiences will continue to haunt his adult life as a professional hockey player.

Followed by a discussion in English

Schedule of the evening

7:00 pm : Opening ceremony and welcomes

7:15 pm: Film Screening

8:40 pm : Discussion between panelists, moderator and public

9:30 pm: End of event

Panelists

• Katelin Peltier, mother of young actor Sladen Peltier and panelist

Short description will be uploaded soon.

• Denise Anne Boissonneau, Knowledge Keeper and panelist

Denise Anne is Anishinaabe Kwe. She is a member of the Garden River First Nation, and an Elder passing down the Ojibwe teachings of Manitoulin Island. She is the proud Grandmother of two grandchildren and the Mother of three resilient children. Denise Anne is committed to Indigenous healing built upon the Seven Grandfather Teachings: wisdom, love, respect, truth, honesty, bravery and humility. She believes that restorative justice empowers the stories of Indigenous peoples who have been through the intergenerational trauma of residential schools. She herself didn’t attend residential school but was directly impacted by her mother who went to St. Anne's Girls School in Spanish, Ontario. She also has seen the social impact of addictions and suicide on many urban Indigenous families and communities. Mino Bimaadiziwin, all our relations.

• Jennifer David, facilitator

Jennifer David has worked in the field of Indigenous communications and consulting for almost 20 years. Prior to consulting, Jennifer was the Director of Communications for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, where she became passionate about Indigenous film and the power of the visual medium.

A member of Chapleau Cree First Nation, Jennifer has degrees in Journalism and English literature from Carleton University. In 2003, Jennifer became a partner and is currently a Senior Consultant with NVision Insight Group, an Indigenous-owned consulting company specializing in workshop design and delivery, strategic and economic development planning, evaluation and communications. Jennifer is a skilled and experienced project manager, communicator, writer and facilitator.

Jennifer is excited about discussing the movie. Indian Horse is particularly resonant as she is from northern Ontario and some of her relatives attended residential school there.

Presented by the Ottawa Public Library in partnership with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and the Ottawa Art gallery.

The Ottawa Public Library is pleased to thank the Friends of the Ottawa Public Library Association (FOPLA), for their generous sponsorship of the event.

• Denise Anne Boissonneau, Knowledge Keeper and panelist

Denise Anne is Anishinaabe Kwe. She is a member of the Garden River First Nation, and an Elder passing down the Ojibwe teachings of Manitoulin Island. She is the proud Grandmother of two grandchildren and the Mother of three resilient children. Denise Anne is committed to Indigenous healing built upon the Seven Grandfather Teachings: wisdom, love, respect, truth, honesty, bravery and humility. She believes that restorative justice empowers the stories of Indigenous peoples who have been through the intergenerational trauma of residential schools. She herself didn’t attend residential school but was directly impacted by her mother who went to St. Anne's Girls School in Spanish, Ontario. She also has seen the social impact of addictions and suicide on many urban Indigenous families and communities. Mino Bimaadiziwin, all our relations.

• Jennifer David, facilitator

Jennifer David has worked in the field of Indigenous communications and consulting for almost 20 years. Prior to consulting, Jennifer was the Director of Communications for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, where she became passionate about Indigenous film and the power of the visual medium.

A member of Chapleau Cree First Nation, Jennifer has degrees in Journalism and English literature from Carleton University. In 2003, Jennifer became a partner and is currently a Senior Consultant with NVision Insight Group, an Indigenous-owned consulting company specializing in workshop design and delivery, strategic and economic development planning, evaluation and communications. Jennifer is a skilled and experienced project manager, communicator, writer and facilitator.

Jennifer is excited about discussing the movie. Indian Horse is particularly resonant as she is from northern Ontario and some of her relatives attended residential school there.

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Date and Time

Location

Galerie d'art d'Ottawa, Hall Alma Duncan | Ottawa Art Gallery, Alma Duncan Salon

50 Mackenzie King Bridge

Ottawa, ON K1N 0C5

Canada

View Map

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