Internet Fragmentation, Reconsidered

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Internet Fragmentation, Reconsidered

There is a lot of talk these days about "fragmenting" the Internet, and different parts of the world having "local internet".

When and where

Date and time

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Online

About this event

  • 1 hour
  • Mobile eTicket

What does that mean? Should we be worried? Supportive? Dismayed? What happens to us if the Internet fragments into different parts? Is there anything we can or ought to do about Internet fragmentation?

Andrew Sullivan, President and CEO of Internet Society, will explore these questions, and open a conversation among attendees about the dangers facing the Internet today. As a number of potentially troubling trends driven by technological developments, government policies and commercial practices ripple across the Internet’s layers, from the underlying infrastructures up to the applications, Internet fragmentation, if left unattended, could chip away to varying degrees at the Internet’s enormous capacity to facilitate human progress. These questions are critical to the future of the Internet.

Andrew Sullivan joined the Internet Society as President and Chief Executive Officer in September 2018. He has focused on Internet infrastructure and standards since 2001, when he worked to launch the .info Internet top-level domain. Because of that experience, he was part of the team that collaborated with the Internet Society to launch the Public Interest Registry, and take over the operation of the .org top-level domain. He was then a principal contributor to the Variant Issues Project (VIP) undertaken by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). The VIP was an effort to bring together several different, previous efforts in support of internationalized domain names. In 2012 he joined Dyn (later, Oracle Dyn) to establish Dyn Labs and then to manage the DNS development and architecture departments. Throughout his career, Andrew has worked to establish and maintain the Internet's critical value as an interoperable, neutral platform.

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