$65 – $600

MOVEMENT RESEARCH INTENSIVE (MRI) 6 SUNDAYS - 6 PRESENTERS

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180 Shaw St

180 Shaw Street

Toronto, ON M6J 2W5

Canada

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MRI Movement Research Intensive 6 Sundays - 6 Presenters

Sept 24 Oct. 1, 22, 29, Nov, 12, 19

Sign up for individual workshops, full days, or the entire intensive.

Diane Bruni, Ruth Douthwright, Erin Godfrey, Daniel Davis, Maddy Shen, Kathleen Rae

This series is designed for people who are interested in expanding their movement repertoire, going deeper into biomechanics, axis syllabus, movement rehab, somatics and yoga for strength

DIANE BRUNI SEPT. 24 AND OCT 1 9:30-12:30

BUILDING BLOCKS OF MOVEMENT-CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENTAL MOVEMENTS

SEPT. 24 - 1-6 MONTHS OCT. 1 - 7-13 MONTHS

Childhood developmental movement patterns represent motor milestones, such as rolling over, crawling, sitting, kneeling, quadruped, squatting and standing and finally walking. All humans master the more primitive positions before moving on to more coordinated/skilled movements.

These building blocks of movement often reveal ‘blind spots’ places where the brain-body connection is weak or blurry. Revisiting these progressions can help us to become more aware of these spaces and give us an opportunity to ‘fill in the blanks’.

DANIEL DAVIS SEPT. 24 1:30PM – 4:30PM

ARM SUPPORT

This class will explore optimal support ranges for the arms as they enter the shoulder girdle and extend to the ground or sky. We will investigate skeletal and soft tissue connections between our arms and our axial skeleton for greater support and ease. >

BIO: Daniel holds an MFA in Dramatic Arts from the University of California, Davis. His creative practice is driven by awe and wonder for humanity and curiosity and respect for the more-than-human world. His work prioritizes content over genre, weaving dance, text, video, music, and new media. He considers all work to be site and context-specific and is interested in mobilizing audience agency through interaction and unconventional use of space.

Daniel has been teaching Axis Syllabus internationally in Europe, Asia, and throughout North America since 2013. He has been teaching contact improvisation and movement education classes for over a decade. In recent years he has been exploring the application of concepts from Somatic Experiencing® to the creation of original performance work with marginalized populations. Whether teaching physical skills or compositional practices, his intention is to foster tools to encourage informed choice, increased possibility and curiosity. He teaches Axis because it has been the most effective tool for transforming his own body and opening countless new physical capacities. Before his current position on faculty at St. Mary's College of Maryland, Daniel worked for a decade as a massage therapist. In all his work - whether through dance, touch, or performance - Daniel's intention is to increase the capacity for aliveness. For information on his teaching and performing practice, visit danielbeardavis.com.

SUN. OCT. 1 ERIN GODFREY 1:30PM – 4:30PM

MODERATION IN MOTION

Exploring co-ordinations for movement utilizing moderate joint ranges. Investigating individual pathways for adjusting and refining static postures to increase possibilities for movement.

Bio: Erin Godfrey is a Movement Educator and Wellness Coach. She began her career as a ballet dancer, studying with the National Ballet School of Canada, followed by studies in Anatomy and Kinesiology at George Brown College. Erin is a certified personal trainer, pilates instructor and life coach. She has owned several studios in Toronto and has been teaching movement and healthful living practices for over 15 years. Erin’s teaching is informed by her research of the human body as a natural system for movement. Specializing in injury recovery and movement training for health and performance. Working with a wide range of students, including those with serious injuries, chronic conditions, new mothers, seniors, dancers and elite athletes.

SUNDAY OCT. 22 Diane Bruni 9:30AM – 12:30PM

YOGA AGAINST RESISTANCE

INTRODUCTION TO THE LOOPS – PART 1

Many long time practitioners of yoga have discovered that yoga alone is not enough to maintain well rounded strength in the body. Yoga typically builds strength in some areas and over stretches other areas.

After many years of personal reflection and research I have designed a new version of a resistance band that will help yoga practitioners find a more balanced strength to flexibly ratio. Its called the LOOP.

Using the LOOP to create resistance builds muscle, decompress joints and increases proprioception (the sense that informs your brain of your body’s location in space).

As you stretch the LOOP moving into yoga poses, it will become increasingly difficult to move. This creates the muscular tension required to stimulate the development of greater strength, and build muscle. It will slow down how you move and require more strength to get into and hold the pose.

SUNDAY OCT. 22 RUTH DOUTHWRIGHT 1:30PM – 4:30PM

WALKING INTO MOVEMENT

Optimal use of the foot, knee, hip, spine and arms to harness gravity. Walking well is a preparation for life, for everything we will do with our bodies. Our walking patterns form the base of unconscious reflexes that serve as a starting point for learning any other coordination, such as sport and dance or any kind of active work.

BIO:Ruth Douthwright is a dance artist and movement educator. For over a decade Ruth has been a certified teacher of the Axis Syllabus offering individual and group movement therapy, dance classes and workshops, and as a guest teacher in Dance and Yoga Teacher Trainings programs both nationally and internationally.

SUNDAY OCT. 29 DIANE BRUNI

YOGA AGAINST RESISTANCE – PART 2

The loops create what is known as ascending resistance which means as the range of motion increases, so does resistance from the LOOP meaning the workload for the muscles increases as the ROM (range of motion) increases.

This in turn creates greater stability at end range, decreasing in the risk of injury commonly experienced when going to end range poses without enough strength to support the range. This tool can help prevent injury while building more resilient strength.

Many yoga related injuries are the result of repeated joint compression and lack of stability, these factors are responsible for breaking down joint surfaces and creating laxity in connective tissues that create stability around joints.

SUNDAY OCT. 29 Madeleine Shen 1:30PM – 4:30PM

THE SPINE

Through movement and imagery, as well as anatomical discussion, we will embody a truer and more articulate spine. Spinal health is crucial for well being – let’s get to know our spine, and how it moves us.

BIO: Madeleine Shen lives in the city jungle of Toronto and spends her time teaching math, dancing and thinking about the body. She is currently studying at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, and is an avid member of the Axis Syllabus International Research Community. With a background in contemporary and modern dance performance, and Biomedical Engineering, she has a dream of one day opening a multifaceted health care practice with movement education and artistic exploration.

SUNDAY NOV. 12 RUTH DOUTHWRIGHT AND ERIN GODFREY 1:30PM – 4:30PM

PROJECTS IN MOTION

In this workshop we will investigate principles of movement found in rolling, crawling, standing, walking and dancing. You can expect guided improvisation, repeating loops and bits of phrase work. Erin and Ruth are informed by many different movement modalities with a shared interest in experiential and theoretical research for functional dynamics applied to dancing, sports, yoga, fitness and everyday pedestrian practices of walking, sitting, standing etc..


DIANE BRUNI NOV. 19

YOGA AGAINST RESISTANCE – PART 3

The LOOPS can be used for any functional movement or yoga pose using varying degrees of resistance, for instance one could push out at full force or barely push at all. Using the bands with minimal force can work to unload muscles and provide movement training assistance. As a result the LOOP can help to create new neural pathways while while improving one’s co ordination making movements and muscles stronger.

KATHLEEN RAE NOV. 19 1:30PM – 4:30PM

LEAD AND LAG

In lead and lag moments the various parts of your body are working in a cooperative manner, in which one body part pulls and tugs on the next. This can bring efficiency to one’s movement and lets the force of an action disperse itself throughout the chain. An example of lead and lag would be to reach across your body with your foot and use this motions to sequentially motor your pelvis, torso and then your neck and head in a twisting motion. The result is a spiral shape.

BIO: Kathleen Rea danced with Canada’s Ballet Jörgen Canada, National Ballet of Canada & Tiroler Landestheater (Austria). Kathleen is a certified instructor of the Melt Method and has taught at School of Toronto Dance Theatre, York University and Niagara College. She is currently a faculty member of George Brown Dance and has choreographed over 40 dance works and been nominated for 5 DORA awards. She is a published author (“The Healing Dance”, Charles C. Thomas). She has a Master’s in Expressive Arts Therapy and is a Registered Psychotherapist (CRPO) with a private practice for the past 15 years. She is the director of REAson d’etre dance productions, which produces the Wednesday Jam.


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180 Shaw St

180 Shaw Street

Toronto, ON M6J 2W5

Canada

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Refund Policy

Refunds up to 30 days before event

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