Free

On Breath Slow Theatre Workshop

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Location

10C Shared Space

42 Carden St.

Guelph, ON N1H 3A2

Canada

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Event description
This relaxed workshop will explore the different nuances of breathing. Participants will explore how to “colour" their breath.

About this Event

Do we need slowness?

For some people, they crave more slowness in their lives. Their bodies are tired from the pressures of their personal and professional lives. There is very little room to reconnect with their bodies.

For others, slowness is an imperative rhythm that is a part of their survival and everyday life. It is frustrating and, at times, they are left waiting for things they we should not have to wait for.

How can we re-imagine a world with new relationships with our bodies, our needs, and our senses?

What is slow theatre?

Slow theatre is a performative process of creating qualitative relationships with our bodies.

Slow theatre is a sensorial-led and playful practise that allows participants to imagine how they can eat, breathe, move, communicate, see, touch, and smell in new personalized ways.

Slow theatre is founded in a disability arts practice and privileges aesthetics of accessibility and atypicality.

Workshop description

This relaxed slow theatre workshop will explore the different nuances of breathing. -Through a series of breathing exercises--both individual and partner exercises--participants will explore how to “colour” their breath.

Participants will be asked to asked to wear comfortable clothes and, if possible, bring a pillow and yoga mat and/or blanket. However, please know that seating will be available. The most important factor in this workshop is to feel comfortable and safe.

Slow Theatre Facilitator:

Ash McAskill is an ally and academic in the disability arts and theatre community, and a slow theatre practitioner. Ash has worked with disabled artists across Canada to mobilize against the current ableism that exists in the performing arts. Her dissertation entitled, “The Atypique Approach: Disability Aesthetics and Theatre-Making in Montréal, Québec and Vancouver, British Columbia” explored how neurodiverse artists are changing understandings of disability and theatre practises in Canada. Currently Ash is living between Guelph, Ontario and Montréal, Québec for a 2-year postdoc funded by the Fonds de Recherche du Québec at the University of Guelph’s ReVision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice. Her project, “Slow Journeys,” explores slowness as a method to challenge ableism and ageism caused by turbo-capitalism. The central question to her project if speed is the problem, then in what ways is the modulation of this speed or acts of “slowness” a possible solution. Slow Journeys examines whether slowness can be generative for creating a meaningful rhythm in which many human communities can feel welcome.

Access notes:

-Please know the building is wheelchair accessible.

-Scent Sensitivities: To minimize scent as much as possible, we kindly ask all attendees to use and wear unscented products.

-All partner exercises are also totally optional and not required.

-If you have any other access needs, please email Ash McAskill: mcaskia003@gmail.com

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Date and Time

Location

10C Shared Space

42 Carden St.

Guelph, ON N1H 3A2

Canada

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