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Open Minds - Celebrating UAlberta's Social Science and Humanities Research

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TELUS Centre, room 150

TELUS Centre, University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta

Canada

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The Office of the Vice-President (Research) and KIAS (Kule Institute for Advanced Study) warmly invite you to "Open Minds 2017" a celebration of Humanities and Social Sciences research at the University of Alberta.

Doors at 4:15 pm, Speakers at 4:30 pm in Room 150, Telus Centre, University of Alberta Campus

Reception to follow in the Telus Atrium

Humanities and social science research opens minds and helps shape a better, brighter future and quality of life for us all by advancing our understanding of social, cultural, political, legal, technological, economic and environmental issues.

Through the study of people and society, our past and present, humanities and social scientists help us better understand ourselves, and our world. By exploring our place in the world now and in the past, humanities and social scientists help identify what we need to survive and thrive in current and future complex and challenging times.

Themes of the Open Minds 2017 lightning talks include: Indigenous students and theatre arts, Syrian Refugee families' transition to Canada, children's language use, temporary foreign workers, perceptions of the environment among religious settlers, human rights in municipal planning, feminists' contributions to future energy options, school sport programs for low-income youth, and women premiers in Canada and Australia.

Join us to explore some of the diverse and topical humanities and social science work at the University of Alberta.

Diane Conrad, Professor, Drama and Theatre Education. [funding: SSHRC PDG, 2016]
Releasing Education from the Colonial Trap
Schools are highly colonized spaces. Even schools with a focus on educating Aboriginal students, which do their best to integrate Indigenous histories, languages cultures and knowledges, are trapped by the hegemonic structures and practices of schooling that continue to perpetuate the values of colonialism. How do we go about releasing education from this colonial trap? This is the question with which our project researching the educational experiences of Aboriginal youth, is confronted.

Lauren Sulz, Assistant Professor, Secondary Education. [funding: SSHRC IDG 2017]
From KidSport to Scholastic Success
Participation in school sport has been associated with several educational benefits. However, children from low-income families experience financial barriers to participation. KidSport, a national non-profit organization, launched a stay-in-school initiative to provide youth in low-income communities by paying school sport fees. Our research uses novel indicators to evaluate the success of this initiative.

Bukola Salami, Assistant Professor, Nursing. [funding: SSHRC IG 2016]
Migration and Precarity
Some 300,000 individuals arrive in Canada annually through diverse temporary worker migration routes, but once here, their future is precarious. Our team is exploring the diverse pathways and structural conditions affecting people’s transition from Temporary Foreign Worker to status such as international student, visitor, permanent resident and/or undocumented migrant.

Joseph Wiebe, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, Augustana. [funding: SSHRC IDG 2017]
Mennonites: Quiet in the Land?
The story of the roles Indigenous and Métis people played in the settlement narratives Mennonites constructed as they were adapting their religious identity to the new prairie landscape has never been told. This project breaks down the “quiet in the land” stereotype by determining the consequences their perceptions of Indigenous people had on Mennonites’ oft-lauded religious relationship to the land.

Sophie Yohani, Associate Professor, Educational Psychology. [funding: SSHRC Syrian Refugee Arrival, Settlement and Integration, targeted research, 2016]
Cultural Brokers and Syrian Families
Syrian families’ experience of violence and destabilization, followed by resettlement in Canada, while necessary, presents numerous challenges to individuals and families. Our team is examining an innovative, community-based model of family support called ‘cultural brokering’ for its impact on Syrian families with young children as they navigate Western culture and institutions and rebuild individual, family and community relationships.

Juhani Järvikivi, Professor, Linguistics. IG 2016
Finding the Duckling
This is a story about a bear, his friends – and a duckling. It is also a story about children, storybooks, mobile eye tracking, and psycholinguistics in the real world. With a little help from the bear and his friends –and SSHRC and all the bright students we can now engage– the team is researching how children learn to process pronouns. This kind of research has never before been conducted in real time, natural settings.

Sheena Wilson, Associate Professor, Culture Studies, Campus Saint-Jean. IG 2016
Feminist. Energy. Just Futures
Energy is social. Our communities are organized around the energy systems that fuel them. Energy transition is thus synonymous with social change, intentional or not. Our project team aims to intentionally shift power systems —social and technical— through knowledge-recovery and knowledge-creation that will help us all speculate on a range of potential futures: ideally feminist and decolonial futures, more equitably attuned to the diverse needs of our local and global communities.

Sandeep Agrawal, Professor of Science and Director of Urban Planning. IG 2016 (Dr. Agrawal also holds a Syrian Refugee Arrival, Settlement and Integration grant from 2016, but will be speaking about his IG).
Human Rights and the City Planner
Several recent court cases have applied Canada’s Charter and human rights legislation to government action, including municipal by-laws. A legal challenge to a zoning by-law provision could make the by-law, one of the major urban planning tools, legally void. Yet, the implications of human rights for planning are not well understood by urban planners, municipal councillors, or by scholars in the planning field. This research helps resolve this crisis by improving the analytical framework and assisting municipalities review and enact constitutionally sound bylaws, plans and policies.

Linda Trimble, Professor Political Science. PDG 2016
Women's Pathways to Political Power
Why have so many women – 15 to date – succeeded in winning the premiership of a Canadian province or Australian state? How did they overcome the barriers to gender equality in political leadership roles? And what impact have women premiers had on women's political representation? Our international team of researchers, government partners, and community stakeholders is working to identify the key individual, institutional, and societal factors that advance women’s political careers.





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TELUS Centre, room 150

TELUS Centre, University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta

Canada

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