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Reflections on Truth and Reconciliation: From Argentina to Canada

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Vancouver Island University

900 Fifth Street

Bldg. 356 (Education/Social Sciences), Room 109 (Lecture Theatre)

Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5

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This event is open to Everyone.

Reflections on Truth and Reconciliation: From Argentina to Canada

Date and time: Monday November 6th, 2017 from 7 – 9 pm

Place: VIU Nanaimo campus, Bldg. 356 (Education/Social Sciences), Room 109 (Lecture Theatre)

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In 1976, Patricia Erb was a student leader and social activist in Buenos Aires. At 19, Patricia was imprisoned, held captive for four weeks and tortured at a secret army site called Campo de Mayo. That same year (1976) Conrad Prince was put up for his second adoption at the age of two. Conrad and his siblings were among more than 20,000 Indigenous children who as part of the Sixties Scoop were apprehended and placed with white families. Under Patricia’s leadership, Save the Children has established an Indigenous Advisory Circle, developed a Relationship Framework and has nurtured new and expanding partnerships with Indigenous children and communities

Patricia and Conrad will share their personal journeys – Patricia will share her thoughts on the power and challenge of Truth, Memory and Justice and reflect on the time this journey has taken for her and for the people of Argentina. Conrad will reflect on what are the first steps along Canada’s path of reconciliation and together they will discuss what lessons can be learned from other Truth and Reconciliation processes and what Canada must learn on its own to achieve ours.

ABOUT THE TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION PROCESS

Canadians are familiar with the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Canada, which examined Canada’s residential school system and its historic impact and current day implications for Indigenous children and communities. The Truth and Reconciliation process was originally developed in Latin America and has been adopted by countries around the world as a means of uncovering, acknowledging and helping people heal from state led or sponsored wrongdoings committed against a targeted population.


One of the first such commissions was established in the early 1980s in Argentina to respond to the human rights violations, disappearances and deaths caused by the military junta that had only recently lost power. While the process in Argentina has been underway for more than 30 years and addresses very different communities and issues, there are lessons to be learned for Canada as we begin our journey.

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Vancouver Island University

900 Fifth Street

Bldg. 356 (Education/Social Sciences), Room 109 (Lecture Theatre)

Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5

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