Shaping Vancouver 2019: Conversation #3: Is Heritage Relevant?

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SFU Woodwards

149 West Hastings Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4

Canada

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Shaping Vancouver 2019: What's the Use of Heritage? Conversation #3: Is Heritage Relevant? Tuesday, November 5; 7-9 PM

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Is Heritage Relevant? Conversation No. 3

In this session, we are excited to welcome these panelists to share their insights about their local places:

Angie Bain – Researcher with the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, Director with Heritage BC

Angie Bain is Nlaka’pamux from Lower Nicola, BC. She is a researcher with the Union of BC Indian Chiefs and also works on Traditional Use studies, crown land referrals, community planning and cultural heritage projects for the Lower Nicola Indian Band. Angie a Research Associate, Volume Editor and member of the Indigenous Advisory Council on the Franz Boas Paper Project. Together with Karen Aird and Gretchen Fox, Angie prepared the recent policy paper Recognizing and Including Indigenous Cultural Heritage in B.C.

Paul Gravett – Executive Director, Heritage BC

Paul Gravett has extensive experience working with not-for-profit organizations as an executive director, interim manager, consultant, and board chair. As a consultant, Paul has worked with organizations in the arts, heritage and wellness sectors, focusing on building viable businesses through values-driven strategies. Paul began work with Heritage BC as interim executive director in 2016, later taking the position on a permanent basis. His work has concentrated on expanding the role of the organization and the inclusivity of its work. Paul led the province-wide State of Heritage project that involved 25 meetings and 500 participants.

Aneesha Grewal – Vice-Chair Punjabi Market Regeneration Collective

Aneesha values land back and eco-community care. Aneesha is a second generation Punjabi settler. Their research interests include identity formation, cultural hybridity and settler colonialism; rooted in decolonial theorizations of oppression and it’s intersections. Aneesha hopes to aid in the decentering and denormalization of capitalism and the white cisheteropatriarchy.

Robert Lemon – Architect, Former Senior Heritage Planner for the City of Vancouver

Robert G. Lemon Architect AIBC has had four decades of experience with heritage conservation in British Columbia. His firm Robert Lemon Architect Inc. has completed award-winning conservation work on Vancouver landmarks including Hotel Georgia, Coastal Church, Shannon Estate, Jameson House and Downtown YMCA. From 1991 to 1996 Lemon was the Senior Heritage Planner for the City of Vancouver where he was oversaw the introduction of heritage legislation and developed the city’s transfer of density policy, Recent Landmarks program and Heritage Interiors initiatives. Lemon wrote the provincial Rehabilitation Standards and Guidelines and was co-author of the heritage provisions of the BC Building Code. He was a member of the working party for the federal Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada. Lemon studied conservation at ICCROM (Rome) and completed his MA in Conservation at University of York (UK). He established local chapters of APT and DOCOMOMO and has given papers on conservation topics in Banff, Trent University, Ottawa, Chicago, Miami, Stockholm and Slovakia. He is the past chair of the Vancouver Heritage Foundation.

OVERVIEW

There is a significant disconnect between heritage as a discipline and heritage as practiced locally on the ground. As a discipline, heritage has changed considerably in recent decades. It has moved beyond traditional boundaries and intersected with issues such as equity, social values, climate change, housing, and community planning.

Provincially, nationally and internationally, experts and experienced professionals consistently identify several core themes and explore their impact on practice:

  • There is a growing interest in heritage as a living system of relationships between people and place;
  • There is an understood need for greater attention to cultural diversity and how different cultural groups value heritage (e.g. First Nations, women, LGBTQ2);
  • Classical heritage concepts around building preservation alone do not address contemporary societal needs and issues; resolution of these needs requires broader and more interdisciplinary approaches

Locally, the heritage field in general is just starting to consider these broader ideas.

Competing meanings have been attached to heritage, and there are opposing views on the evolution of the discipline expressed. Some feel heritage has broadened too far while others feel strongly that heritage needs to continually re-examine its concepts in order to respond to current needs. This comes at a time when there is increasing questioning of the usefulness of heritage due to its traditional focus on preservation.

In this third installment of Shaping Vancouver, we will examine the disruption taking place in heritage and the challenges it faces in remaining relevant.

This event is worth 2 organized & structured CPL units

Date and Time

Location

SFU Woodwards

149 West Hastings Street

Vancouver, BC V6B 1H4

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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