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SIN Talk: Sex, Gender, and Sexuality in Relation to Biospychosocial Stress

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Location

Sidney Smith Hall

100 Saint George Street

Room: Psychology Lounge (4043)

Toronto, ON M5S 3G3

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The first Sexuality Interest Network (SIN) meeting of the year will be Wednesday September 20th from 4:00-5:30pm in the Psychology Lounge (Sid Smith RM 4043). Guest speaker Dr. Robert Juster (Columbia University) will be speaking on 'Sex, Gender, and Sexuality in Relation to Biospychosocial Stress’.


Presented by the Einstein and VanderLaan Labs at U of T, the Sexuality Interest Network (SIN) brings students and researchers from social, developmental, biobehavioral, and clinical programs together to exchange ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality.


We are looking forward to seeing you all there!


For more information, please contact Dani Jacobson at dani.jacobson@mail.utoronto.ca.


Talk Abstract: Every cell is sexed, every person is gendered, and every organism is stressed. Whereas sex refers to a multi-dimensional construct that includes genes, anatomy, gonads, and hormones that collectively define us as male or female, gender refers to an array of socio-culturally constructed roles, orientations, and identities that further influence within-sex variations in stress and coping. Diverse sexual orientations and gender identities are also related to unique sets of exposures and experiences that correspond with health inequalities that are the focus of my current postdoctoral research. In this talk, I will share my transdisciplinary research program that nuances sex, gender, and sexuality in relation to stress biology and mental health throughout lifespan development. By applying a sex- and gender-based analysis that appreciates individual variation beyond sex binaries, I will demonstrate how one’s sex, sex hormones, gender-roles, and sexual orientation uniquely influence functioning of the stress hormone cortisol and multi-systemic physiological dysregulation known as allostatic load linked to physical and mental health alike. The take-home message of this decade’s worth of integrative neuroscience research can be summarized as follows: when studying stress-related phenomena that appears to differ between the sexes, accounting for both biological factors like sex hormones and gender-based factors like gender-roles and sexual orientation allows researchers to delineate inter-individual diversity more fully. At theoretical, empirical, and clinical levels, this approach provides a powerful framework to help solve health problems that cannot be easily explained by focusing solely on binary sex differences.

Date and Time

Location

Sidney Smith Hall

100 Saint George Street

Room: Psychology Lounge (4043)

Toronto, ON M5S 3G3

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