The Real World Laboratory of Algorithmic Policing and Migration Control

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Petra Molnar and Kate Robertson discuss of how algorithmic control is instituted and maintained in law enforce algorithmic controls.

About this Event

Please join Ryerson University Library in welcoming Petra Molnar from York University and Kate Robertson from the Citizen Lab. Join them in a discussion of how algorithmic control is instituted and maintained in law enforcement and migration environments.

Petra Molnar, the author of Technological Testing Grounds and co-author of Bots at the Gate, will discuss the ways in which refugees and immigrants are used to test automated decision-making systems.

Kate Robertson, co-author of To Surveil and Predict, will explain the ways in which predictive policing practices are utilized in Canada and the larger implications of the broad use of such technologies.

The talks will be followed by a question and answer. If interested, the full reports can be read at:

About the Speakers

Petra Molnar is a lawyer and researcher specializing in migration, technology, and human rights. She is currently co-creating the Migration and Technology Monitor, a collective of civil society, journalists, academics, and filmmakers interrogating technological experiments on people crossing borders. Petra is the author of the recent report Technological Testing Grounds, foregrounding the perspectives of people on the move in Greece and Europe, and is the associate director of the Refugee Law Lab, Osgoode Hall Law School.

Kate Robertson practices as a criminal law barrister in Toronto, Canada. Her practice includes both trial and appellate advocacy, and she has advocated at all levels of court in Canada. Prior to joining her law firm, Kate served as a law clerk at the Supreme Court of Canada for the Hon. Justice Rosalie Silberman Abella. In addition to her law practice, Kate holds a fellowship at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, where she consults on law and policy issues relating to human rights and law enforcement surveillance. In 2020, Kate co-authored a report published jointly by The Citizen Lab and the University of Toronto’s International Human Rights Program, titled To Surveil and Predict: A Human Rights Analysis of Algorithmic Policing Technology in Canada. She has forthcoming publications (2021) on litigating the use of artificial intelligence in criminal justice proceedings. Kate is also regularly involved in strategic advocacy relating to digital privacy and related human rights for organizations such as the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the Criminal Lawyers’ Association, and the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic. She completed her law degree at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Law after working with the United Nations in Cambodia in the investigation of the former Khmer Rouge regime's surviving senior leaders at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal.

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