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We Should Know Each Other - April Session

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St David's Anglican Church

49 Donlands Avenue

Toronto, ON M4J 3N5

Canada

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Inspired by an idea from Joy Kogawa, this series is designed to create a space for conversations with these Japanese Canadians and the broader JC community. Encouraging dialogue, reconnecting over common interests and priorities, and opening doors to creating a vibrant inter-generational community.We are thrilled to annouce Mio Adilman, Sachiko Murakami and Kelly Fleck for our April conversation session.

Mio Adilman is a comedy actor and writer. Alongside his brother, Nobu Adilman, he has written for the comedy series Trailer Park Boys and Yoga, Man (2003). With his brother, Adilman hosted the CBC game show SmartAsk! for two years. Adilman is the son of late Canadian Variety editor and Toronto Star arts journalist, Sid Adilman.

Currently Adilman is the producer of The Zoomer. He has produced and reported on a variety of CBC programming, including Q, As it Happens and Definitely not the Opera.

Sachiko Murakami: Japanese Canadian history is a very real part of Sachiko Murakami's own family history and one she bravely shares in her poetry. She is the author of poetry collections, The Invisibility Exhibit (2008), Rebuild (2011) and Get Me Out of Here (2015)

Murakami's first collection of poems, The Invisibility Exhibit, was written during the time of missing women in downtown Vancouver, followed by the intense media coverage and conviction of notorious serial killer Robert Picton. Murakami explores the dichotomy of a marginalized and invisible community surrounded by sensational media coverage. The book was a finalist for the Governor General Literary Awards for Poetry.

Murakami currently sits on the Talonbooks editorial board and edits poetry for Insomniac Press.

Kelly Fleck is the editor of the Nikkei Voice, a Japanese-Canadian national newspaper. As a recent graduate for Carleton University's journalism and communication program, she volunteered with the paper for four years before taking on the job. Working at Nikkei Voice, Fleck has her finger on the pulse of Japanese Canadian culture and community.

The Nikkei Voice is an important medium for Japanese Canadian expression and communication. The paper was founded in 1987 as a vehicle to inform the Nikkei about the Japanese Canadian redress movement. It has now evolved into a cornerstone for Japanese Canadian culture and community.

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St David's Anglican Church

49 Donlands Avenue

Toronto, ON M4J 3N5

Canada

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