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Science World at TELUS World of Science

1455 Quebec Street

Vancouver, BC V6A 3Z7

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All talks begin at 7pm, doors open at 6pm. Before the talk begins, join us in a set of interactive, hands-on activities and scientific demonstrations related to the evening's talk.

Why the Amazon Matters:

Nature as Teacher with Lee Beavington

Where Forest, River, and Sky Conspire with Dr. Farhad Dastur



Nature as Teacher

Speaker: Lee Beavington, Department of Biology, KPU

Kids spend 7 hours a day on screens and 7 minutes a day in nature. Time in nature promotes the development of children who are more attentive, active, creative—and perhaps most importantly—more connected to the natural world.

Is nature-deficit disorder real? How can nature be our greatest teacher? Walking amongst the conifer giants of our temperate rain forest, immersed in direct sensory experiences, rekindles our connection to the more-than-human world. As an ecologist and Amazon Field School instructor currently researching ‘nature experience’, Lee Beavington’s presentation integrates science, ecopsychology and arts-based learning. He will explore how robins can teach us biology, how rivers reveal physics, and offer inspiration for nature-based education.

Where Forest, River, and Sky Conspire

Speaker: Dr. Farhad Dastur, Department of Psychology, KPU

The Amazon is Earth’s imagination. Here we witness evolution’s genius for design and the limitless solutions to the existential problems of survival. These are the creative forces that allow an insect to mimic a plant and a plant to mimic an insect. Here, forest, river, and cloud conspire to create the world’s most diverse ecosystem: home to 2.5 million insect, 40,000 plant, and 1,300 bird species. Here flows one fifth of the planet’s fresh water in a river so great that it dilutes the Atlantic Ocean over 100 km out to sea. Here, every year, falls 27 million tons of fertilizing dust carried on winds from the Sahara Desert. Some of the rainforest’s 3,000 fruits could broaden our diets, delight our palates, and provide many health benefits, while Amazonian botanicals may be tomorrow’s cures for a range of ailments. The indigenous cultures of the Amazon are equally magnificent. The oldest archaeological evidence of humans in the Amazon dates back 11,000 years. The Watoto, Makuna, and Yanomami are just a few of the 200 indigenous cultures inhabiting the forest. Seventy-seven of these tribes have had little or no contact with the outside world. What wisdom, knowledge, and stories do they possess? Sadly, all this biodiversity and cultural diversity are under threat. The Amazon is now 20% smaller than it was 40 years ago, the consequence of a perfect storm of climate change, colonialism, corruption, unsustainable development, deforestation, cattle ranching, and industrial farming. Given the Amazon’s immense biological and cultural significance, and the answers it holds to the problems of both today and tomorrow, we are compelled to ask: What would it mean if we lost the Amazon?


The KPU-Science World Speaker Series is a partnership developed between KPU and Science World that supports the expansion of science in our communities. Join us for our third season of talks that work to engage, entertain and educate guests with fascinating insights into the world of science.


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Science World at TELUS World of Science

1455 Quebec Street

Vancouver, BC V6A 3Z7

Canada

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