$50 – $125

Widows, Orphans and Tough-Minded Mothers: the Early New Kingdom

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

University of Toronto

4 Bancroft Avenue

Room 200B

Toronto, ON M5S 1C1

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Event description

Description

Widows, Orphans and Tough-Minded Mothers: the Early New Kingdom

The Royal Family at Thebes chose to oppose alien Hyksos rulers in the North, and it cost them dearly. Strong young kings died in battles, leaving young siblings and children to succeed. While kings like Ahmose I were growing up, the royal women of the 17th and early 18th Dynasties ruled the land and may even have appeared on the battlefield. The succession of child-kings, rather than weakening the native dynasty, allowed Teti-Sheri and Ahmes-Nefertari to establish the culture and institutions that became the New Kingdom. Their power and brilliance set the stage for the glorious reign of their descendant, the woman king, Hatshepsut.

One of the extraordinary things about the New Kingdom is that we are able to see the coffins, grave goods, and even the mummified faces of the great kings and queens of the period. Meeting the Royal Mummies and learning a little of their bio-histories will be an integral part of this course.

Week One ~ Wednesday, October 10, 2018 ~ Crocodile Kings, the Hyksos, and an Empty Throne

The Sixteenth Dynasty of Thebes ruled under the authority of foreign Hyksos in the North, but began to re-establish the power of the South. With a change of dynasty, Theban kings of the Seventeenth Dynasty fought actively to reunite their country. Absence in battle and death on the battle field meant that the power of rulership was in the hands of the royal women. When King Sequenre Tao was killed on the battlefield, QueenTeti-Sheri held the South together, raised the next generation of kings, and may even have appeared on the battlefield herself.

Week Two ~ Wednesday, October 17, 2018 ~ Uniting the Two Lands: Queen Mothers and Golden Flies

During the struggle for independence, Teti-Sheri, Aahotep, and Ahmnes-Neferatri consolidated the kingdom and change the way the office of Queen was perceived, and, more importantly, financed. More than five hundred years after her death, Ahmnes-Nefertari was a beloved goddess in Deir el Medina, the village of the Royal Workmen. With such women at his side and at his back, Ahmose founded the New Kingdom, Egypt’s period of greatest expansion and wealth.

Week Three ~ Wednesday, October 24, 2018 ~ South of the Border

Ahmose’s job was only half done when the Hyksos rulers abandoned Egypt; the Kingdom of Kerma in Nubia still threatened his control over the South and the trade routes to West Central Africa. Fortunately, at El Kab, governors who spent their youth following the king into battle left accounts of their campaigns and provide vital background information as to the progress of the early Eighteenth Dynasty.

Week Four ~ Wednesday, October 31, 2018 ~ Hatshepsut’s Path to Kingship

Mut, Goddess of Sovereignty, and Amun, King of the Gods, were Hatshepsut’s allies in her consolidation of power. In addition to divine aid, Hatshepsut gathered brilliant and dedicated civil servants around herself. King’s Daughter, King’s Sister and Great Royal Wife, she was a royal partner in civic and religious sphere long before her coronation as king.

Presenter: Gayle Gibbson


Gayle Gibson

Gayle Gibson is an internationally renowned mummy and coffin expert, appearing in numerous history documentaries over the years, including Museum Secrets, Nova: The Mummy Who Would be King, and 2014's BBC One program: Tutankhamen, the Truth Uncovered. Her name also made the news this past fall when she discovered the name of a female mummy – ‘Nefer-Mut’ (a.k.a “Justine”) – who had lain unidentified in the ROM museum vaults for decades. She also identified that peculiar Egyptian Mummy in the old Niagara Museum back in the 1990s as none other than Pharaoh Ramses I, and helped to get him back to Egypt.

Breathing life into the ancient Egyptians is what Gibson does best. A consummate storyteller, she has not only led countless tours of the ROM’s collections to school groups but has also taught some of the ROM’s best-attended courses on hieroglyphics and ancient Egyptian history.

APR 29, 2015 BY LAURA RANIERI BLOOR WEST VILLAGER


Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

University of Toronto

4 Bancroft Avenue

Room 200B

Toronto, ON M5S 1C1

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Save This Event

Event Saved