$15 – $20

William Parker & Patricia Nicholson Parker

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Silence, 46 Essex Street, Guelph

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Hope Cries for Justice
Music & Dance/ on tour

Co-presented by the Guelph Jazz Festival and Silence

Patricia Nicholson began Arts for Art and the Vision Festival 22 years ago, as a manifestation of ideology and aesthetics that are deeply shared with William Parker. They are bringing their art and ideas on a Road Trip this summer as a special project to share the transformative art that brings hope & the ideas that may help to transform our society and make it once again a place where peoples needs and rights are supported. And where truth is respected.

William Parker and Patricia Nicholson make music, dance, poetry, as it comes through them, in order to uplift encourage and inspire the listener to enter the realm of their higher self. So they in turn may, in their own lives and work, act as a force for good. The ultimate goal of the art is for all who listen to it be filled with compassion.

For these performances the work will be a structured improvisation utilizing words, (spoken or sung), movements and tonal structures. The structures for the dance and music will carry the form of the piece and communicate the essential theme. The improvisation will elaborate on those structures so that the work can take advantage of and amplify what is happening in the moment. The essential intellectual theme is that through art and a reverence for life and all that is creative, we can create a world where Peace becomes possible.

We make a point of giving equality to all of the arts utilized in each presentation. This then becomes an example of how we can work together for mutual benefit. Each artist is encouraged to utilize the full strength of their artistic discipline, bringing to audiences a powerful and unique presentation.

The goal of this tour is to create a dialogue between participating artists and audiences that opens the mind to envisioning our role in the world as creative beings that can make a difference. By embracing creativity we find our strength and can reclaim hope in a difficult time.

Patricia Nicholson – dance, voice, words
William Parker – bass, donso nghoni, shakuhachi, reeds, percussion

Press:

Creative power-couple bassist-composer William Parker (http://www.williamparker.net/) and dancer-choreographer Patricia Nicholson Parker, do not mince words when it comes to artistic vision. In a 2008 interview in All About Jazz, Nicholson says “We need to take our visions seriously.” Early in their careers, Nicholson and Parker created a huge repertoire of composed music for multiple ensembles, directing and organizing “A Thousand Cranes Peace Opera,” for the opening of the UN Special Sessions on Disarmament and working with bassist Peter Kowald to help organize the artist-run Sound Unity Festivals between 1984 and 1988. Nicholson successfully initiated the Improvisers Collective, which morphed into the Vision Festival, and together they have worked meticulously to bring the Vision Festival to New York for the last 15 years. Parker emphasizes performance and Nicholson works tirelessly behind the scenes. Progressive jazz lovers in New York know the annual Vision Festival as a marker of endurance, emphasizing a sense of community as it continues to profile free jazz and avant-garde music in the face of more commercial musical enterprises. Art for Art, an organization Nicholson founded in 1995, also coordinates a weekly Vision Club series, and each year the Vision Festival honors the lifetime achievement of a particular artist.

In 2007, in keeping with this emphasis on the links between music, community, and justice, Parker released The Inside Songs of Curtis Mayfield with poet Amiri Baraka, a project that sought to see what was happening to the people by investigating the music. A discussion around this work, and the very future of jazz, between Parker, Baraka, and Ron Gaskin, took place during the 2007 Guelph Jazz Festival Colloquium, and can be found here.
Listen to - or read - New York Times contributor Nate Chinen's broad-ranging conversation with Parker and Nicholson, and read Chinen's reflections on their discussion, in our research collection.

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