$30 – $110

2018 Decolonizing Conference: Dialoguing and Living Well Together - Decolon...

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

OISE

252 Bloor Street West

Toronto, ON M5S 1V6

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Event description

Description

DATES: November 8 - 10, 2018

EARLY REGISTRATION DEADLINE: July 31, 2018

GENERAL REGISTRATION: August 1 - September 6, 2018

*Registration fees inclusive of breakfast and lunch | All tickets, except for "single day" tickets cover all three days*


CIARS is pleased to announce that it is holding its XI Decolonizing Conference for critical dialogues on the theme of “Dialoguing and Living Well Together: Decolonization and Insurgent Voices”.

Using a Decolonizing perspective, the conference hopes to explore new meanings of “living well together” outside of White mythology (in Derrida’s terms) and the capitalist paradigm. We ask: how do we bring non-Western epistemologies to a terrain that has existed through a long-exercised White Mythology? What Indigenous experiences speak to the possibility of living well together in new futures? What additional dimensions of the above can be gleaned from the constant mobility of bodies, identities, subjectivities and relations?

***


KEYNOTES

  • Molefi Kete Asante

  • To be announced!

  • To be announced!

  • To be announced!


PLENARY PANELS

  • Plenary 1: Trumpism and the rise of the alt-right

  • Plenary 2: Reframing Intersectional theory

  • Plenary 3: Indigenous concepts

  • Plenary 4: Fall Institute: Decolonizing our learning spaces


“ALT RIGHT” AND TRUMPISM

“Alt Right” conservativism seeks to erase not only the history of colonization, genocide, and enslavement, but also present day coloniality, settler colonialism, and the ongoing forms of imperialism and militarism that justify, rationalize, and sustain the ideological and systemic practices of the White supremacist, heteropatriarchal, capitalist state.

How does the creation, usage and legitimization of the “Alt Right” narrative erase White supremacy and its multiple manifestations? What are the dangers of utilizing the term and discourse of “Alt Right” rather than naming White supremacy? What is at stake when we solely focus on Trump(ism), rather than acknowledging that these issues pre-date Trump? How does claiming identity as an “Alt Right” rather than a White supremacist legitimize political beliefs and platforms? How do we account for the rise of coded words such as “Alt Right” and Trumpism?

The continuing blatant forms of racial, class, gendered, sexualized, ableist violence and hate permeated through the colonizing logics of White supremacy speaks to the severity of issues for certain bodies and how White bodies in a White supremacist culture rationalize their ideological beliefs. When we fail to act decisively, oppressed bodies also become complicit and implicated in these racist and oppressive relations. What do we see as the impact and implications for decolonial politics that engage issues at these intersections? How do forces mobilize politically and intellectually to deal with this menace?

This plenary will focus on the particular understandings of White logics and the task of thinking through collective lives and a politics of futurity with mutual responsibilities and reciprocity in mind.

REFRAMING INTERSECTIONS AND INTERSECTIONAL THEORY

This plenary will take up ‘intersectional theory’ broadly as a lens for political action to interrogate and challenge solidarity work (e.g., the question of allyship). It aims to address the poverty of intersections as a framework for solidarity work.

We highlight the seduction of liberal social oppression work, and consequently a need to reframe the radical, decolonial politics of solidarity. Intersections are supposed to help us link up oppressions and work in solidarities. Yet, ‘allyship’, for example, as shared oppressions and intersecting privileges necessitating the creation of ‘communities in solidarities’ has been spiritually, emotionally and physically wounding. How do we speak/engage/dialogue on the intersectionality of struggles, resistance, and a rootedness of oppressions—particularly today—in White supremacist capitalist structures and logics, while at the same time keeping a firm hold on the saliencies of issues for Black and Indigenous bodies? Do we continue to injure Black and Indigenous bodies when we read/interpret attempts to center ‘saliencies of particular oppressions’ as claims of ‘oppression olympics’ (Smith)?

‘Critical Friends’ ask us to interrogate solidarity work informed about intersections and to remind us that at the heart of this politics should be relations between and among people, as well as (across) different Lands and different geographies. The success of our politics of solidarity will depend on an informed understanding of the philosophical grounding of what we are seeking to do and the resolve to accomplish the task irrespective of challenges and risks, including losing power & privilege.

INDIGENOUS CONCEPTS

Part of the project of educational decolonization is for Indigenous, racialized and oppressed peoples to be able to pioneer new analytical systems for understanding our own communities based on our “home grown cultural perspectives” (Yankah 2004, p. 25). Picking up on the main conference theme the session will explore questions such as: How do we bring non-Western epistemologies to a terrain that has existed through a long-exercised White Mythology? What Indigenous experiences speak to the possibility of living well together in new futures? What additional dimensions of the above can be gleaned from the constant mobility of bodies, identities, subjectivities and relations?

We know there are some local concepts which have been pioneered by Indigenous peoples to understand their communities and to explore ways groups can and do live well together. For example, Suma Qamaña for Aymaras and Sumak Kawsay for Quechuas in the Andes; Ubuntu, a traditional philosophy that also brings us to a different paradigm when thinking about life and living well; Suahunu – The Trialectic Space, exploring the body, mind, soul, and spirit interface; the Nuu-chah-nulth notion of tsawalk “one” which embodies the thoroughgoing ontological unity of all existence and the interdependence of human community and the individual; and Tawhid, in the Islamic tradition represents the oneness of creation.

This session will examine the knowledge principles of these Indigenous ideas and the potential for educational transformation and decolonization.


WORKSHOP & SESSION THEMES

  • Traditional Indigenous knowledge systems for Living Well

  • Biodiversity and the Capitalization of Nature

  • Water, Life and Communities

  • The Anthropocene and the Racialization of Resources

  • Migration, Exploitation and Resistance

  • White Mythology and other Epistemologies

  • Sustainable Economies, Food Sovereignty and Living Well

  • Anti-Muslim Racism

  • Imperialism, Militarism, and Islamophobia

  • Black and Indigenous Futurisms

  • Race, Education and the Academy

  • Counter-Visions of Education

  • Indigenous Resurgences and New Possibilities

  • Race and Gender Violence

  • Race, Culture and New Media

  • Race, Policing and the Justice System

  • Blackness and Anti-Blackness

  • Whiteness and White Supremacy

  • Anti-Racist Feminisms

  • Race, Queer, and Disability

  • Reframing Intersectionalities

  • “Mixed” Race Identities

  • Race, Immigration and Resettlement

  • The Nation State, Citizenship and International Development

  • Language, Race, and Education

  • Spiritualities and Land

  • Pedagogies and Land

  • Environmental Coloniality

  • Race, Environment and Health

  • Interculturalism and Decoloniality

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

OISE

252 Bloor Street West

Toronto, ON M5S 1V6

Canada

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Save This Event

Event Saved