Vavilov’s First Birthday

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Analyzing the implications of Vavilov for administrative decision-making one year after the landmark decision

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Join some of Canada's leading experts for a day-long conference analyzing the implications of the key decision of Vavilov for various areas of administrative decision-making. We will celebrate Vavilov's first birthday on December 18.

The conference will be remote, on Zoom, and free to attend. The format will be a series of round-table discussions.

The conference will be in English only, and a Zoom link will be sent out to attendees before December 18,2020.

Here is the agenda for the day:

Panel 1: Vavilov In Perspective (10.45-11.45 EST)

David Mullan, Professor Emeritus at Queen's University

Mary Liston, Peter A. Allard School of Law

Lauren Wihak, McDougall Gauley LLP, Saskatchewan

Sheila Wildeman, Dalhousie University, Schulich School of Law

Audrey Boctor, IMK Advocates

Panel 2: Vavilov and Judicial Review (12.00-1.15 EST)

Cristie Ford, Peter A. Allard School of Law (Economic Regulation)

Stéphanie Roy, Université Laval (Environmental Law)

Jamie Liew, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law (Common Law) (Immigration Law)

Steve Barrett, Goldblatt Partners, Toronto (Labour Law)

Panel 3: Vavilov and Decision-making (1.30-2.45 EST)

Jennifer Khurana, Vice-Chairperson Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (Human Rights Tribunals)

Angus Grant, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (Process and Substance)

Jennifer Raso, University of Alberta, Faculty of Law (Front-Line Decision-making)

Justice Alexander Pless, Superior Court of Québec (Judicial Perspective)

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About Professor Paul Daly

Associate Professor Paul Daly holds the University Research Chair in Administrative Law & Governance at the University of Ottawa, to which he was recruited from the Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge. Previously, he was successively Assistant Professor, Associate Dean and Associate Professor at the Faculté de droit, Université de Montréal and held visiting positions at Harvard Law School and Université Paris II, Panthéon-Assas. A graduate of University College Cork (B.C.L., LL.M.), the University of Pennsylvania Law School (LL.M.) and the University of Cambridge (Ph.D.), his influential scholarly work on public law – dozens of books, peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters and shorter pieces – has been widely cited, including by the Supreme Court of Canada, various other Canadian courts and tribunals, the Irish Supreme Court and the High Court of Australia. His blog, Administrative Law Matters, was the first blog ever cited by the Supreme Court of Canada.

Dr. Daly’s practice and research interests span the broad field of public law, with a particular emphasis on judicial review, advice and training for regulatory agencies and administrative tribunals, public authority liability and complex constitutional issues. He has worked for numerous public and private sector clients including the Attorney General of Canada, Bell Canada, Canadian Heritage, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, the Immigration and Refugee Board, the Law Society of Saskatchewan and the National Football League. Since September 1, 2019 he has been a part-time Review Officer of the Environmental Protection Tribunal of Canada.

He has been involved, in various capacities, in major issues of public importance and public law litigation, most notably the Supreme Court of Canada’s administrative law trilogy (assisted counsel for Bell Canada and the National Football league), the Supreme Court Act Reference (submissions to the Senate), reform of the Copyright Board (commissioned to write a government report), succession to the Canadian throne (assisted in the preparation of an expert report) and other matters which are currently being litigated in Canadian courts.

* I know that Vavilov was handed down on December 19, but December 18 is the closest workday: chalk this down as another of the inconveniences 2020 has visited upon us.

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