From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg: Memoir & Testimony of Abraham Sutzkever

Actions Panel

From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg: Memoir & Testimony of Abraham Sutzkever

Life and death in the Vilna Ghetto by one of the great Yiddish poets of the twentieth century.| Edited and translated by Justin Cammy.

When and where

Date and time

Location

Gelber Conference Centre 5151 Cote Ste Catherine, Montreal, QC H3W 1M6 CANADA Montréal, QC H3W 2W8 Canada

Map and directions

How to get there

Refund Policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.
Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

About this event

The Yentl Rubin and Mordko Fishman Memorial Endowment

presents

From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg: Memoir and Testimony of Abraham Sutzkever

Edited and translated by Justin Cammy

Life and death in the Vilna Ghetto by one of the great Yiddish poets of the twentieth century.

In this very special on-stage discussion, Smith College Chair of Jewish Studies and World Literature, Justin Cammy, discusses the first English translation of Abraham Sutzkever’s ground-breaking and tragic 1944 memoir which chronicles for the first time the destruction of Vilna’s Jewish Quarter and the effects this destruction had on the “Jerusalem of the North.” The vanishing world that Sutzkever depicts here hints tragically at the eventual scale of the Holocaust.

Through the eyes of one survivor who attempted to make sense of daily life, resistance, and death in the ghetto, From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg, is a unique tale that sits at the intersections of Holocaust history, memory, and testimony from one of the great Jewish writers of the 20th Century.

Justin Cammy is professor and chair of Jewish Studies and World Literatures at Smith College in Massachusetts. A graduate of McGill and Harvard, he is a noted scholar of modern Yiddish literature and culture who has held fellowships at the University of Michigan, UCLA, Yad Vashem, and the Hebrew University. His translation of From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2021) was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award.